Accountants and solicitors join together to deliver a masterclass to businesses on the latest legal and tax issues

Jo YeatesOne of York’s top law firms Hethertons Solicitors has teamed up with accountancy experts Ian Walker & Co Chartered Accountants to deliver a masterclass on important issues to local business owners.

The two firms of professionals will be giving York’s business community advice on a range of topics including employment law, pension provisions, Making Tax Digital and new data protection rules at an event held on 7 March 2018 at the National Centre for Early Music at St Margaret’s Church in Percy’s Lane

Organised by Make It York – the city’s destination management organisation – the talk, entitled “How confident are you your business isn’t overpaying the taxman?”, will feature specialist tax advisors from Ian Walker & Co Chartered Accountants who will cover pre-tax year-end planning, auto-enrolment compliance and an update on the Government’s digital tax regime.

In addition, Jo Yeates, the Head of Hethertons’ Employment Law team will be joined by Senior Associate David Scott to provide a HR and employment law update and brief guests on the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force on 25 May 2018.

Speaking ahead of the event, Jo said: “Last year was a busy year for employment law with the cases on employee status, the Taylor Review, and a raft of new legislation. 2018 will see Businesses facing a number of new challenges, with changes to tax, employment law data protection being just some of the things they need to consider.

“We are excited to be speaking with Ian Walker & Co Chartered Accountants on the most current issues that York’s business leaders need to be aware of and we would encourage those who have queries to join us.”

The event starts at 8.30 am with refreshments, with presentations beginning at 9am. Tickets can be purchased by visiting https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/how-confident-are-you-your-business-isnt-overpaying-the-taxman-tickets-42353459337

CMI suggests that longer hours could actually harm productivity

An average boss works a day a week more than he or she is paid to, recent research by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) suggested.

The organisation had polled more than 1,000 managers around the UK and found that, on average, an individual was working 7.5 hours over and above their contract.

This adds up to an equivalent of 43.8 days of overtime over the course of a 12 month period.

A similar survey, carried out in 2015, put overtime for senior staff at 39.6 days – suggesting that the amount of extra work has risen slightly in the course of the past couple of years.

There are concerns, however, that longer working weeks and the fact that managers are often connected to their workplace by technology may take a toll on mental health and ultimately affect business performance.

Petra Wilson, the CMI’s director of strategy, said: “Despite the jump in hours, we remain a lot less productive than our European counterparts in France and Germany, where they work shorter weeks.

“Improving managers’ quality of working life should be every employer’s New Year’s resolution to boost productivity.

“This means encouraging managers to switch-off, helping them to deal with the pressure, and giving them the training and support they need to perform.”

Sir Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at Manchester Business School, said: “The UK’s long hours culture is detrimental to the wellbeing of managers, and it’s bashing national productivity.

“Long office hours combined with the always-on expectation to answer emails, is eating into home life, leaving managers with little chance of respite and increasing stress levels.

“Improving the quality of working life for managers will be a major step forward to solving our productivity crisis.”

If you would like advice on employment legislation relating to staff hours please contact Hethertons’ head of employment Jo Yeates (jy@hethertons.co.uk) or David Scott (ds@hethertons.co.uk).

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